Thursday, April 7, 2016

F - FAIRBANKS

IS FOR FAIRBANKS



The largest city in interior Alaska, Fairbanks is home to the University of Alaska Fairbanks. One of the first places I lived after arriving in Alaska. It's a lovely town that tries hard to hold on to the early days when a steamboat would bring prospectors and supplies up the Tanana River.

Named after the 26th Vice President, Charles W. Fairbanks, who served under Theodore Roosevelt. It's known for its subarctic cold and its short but warm summers. I remember summer days that were as hot as 90 degrees and winter days as cold as 50 below.



Murder & Obsession

Excerpt:
                 Photo Copyright
Steven took the document, scanned it. “A search warrant. Regarding what? The Captain has my schedule. I’m due in the office Monday. Why drive all the way out here? Damn it, Helen. What the hell is going on?” He stood.
“Two women are dead. We have witnesses putting you with them just hours before they died.” She placed two pictures on the counter. “Do you recognize them?”
He scanned the photos. “Sure, I had a drink with her in Anchorage. April, I think she called herself.” He pointed to the other picture. “I bought her dinner after her car broke down, at the Bull Moose Diner in Fairbanks. What happened to them?”
“Strangled, dumped on the side of the road. So, yes, we’re here searching for evidence. Preliminary forensics ties you to them. Did you sleep with them?”
“Strangled, what are you accusing me of? Sleep with―you actually believe―” His anger escalated with each word. “I’m your suspect?”

*****


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44 comments:

  1. Hi, Renee,

    Whoa, I didn't know Fairbanks has such extremities in their weather. Chicago comes a close second. I've experienced 102 degrees here as well as 40 below wind chills... I think the coldest was around 15 below. That's why I need to get out of here. LOL

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    1. Hi, Michael, Chicago does have drama with its weather too! Ice fog too!

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  2. Is it just serendipity that it has a river flowing through? When I heard it first I thought it would be so named because of riverbanks! Such extremes of weather should make for huge contrasts between winter and spring, seasons generally and flora/fauna. Another evocative name.

    Btw, just noticed I am on your secret list!!! I feel seriously special! :D

    And I totally remember reading that excerpt.

    Best always,
    Nila.

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    1. Hi, Nila, your are special! Cool, you're reading the book! I'm smiling! :)

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  3. 90 to 50 below - that's quite a spread. I guess that's the definition of needing a summer and winter wardrobe :). Sounds like Steven is right in the frame.
    Tasha
    Tasha's Thinkings | Wittegen Press | FB3X (AC)

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    1. Hi, Natasha, Steven has been framed up good! LOL

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  4. I love the excerpt, Yolanda. I would like to visit Alaska at some point, despite the cold.

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    1. Hi, Nicola, thanks, I hope you get the chance!

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  5. Really exciting excerpt today, gave me a little scrunchy feeling inside!
    Sophie
    Sophie's Thoughts & Fumbles | Wittegen Press | FB3X

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  6. I loved researching Fairbanks and writing about it for my Polar stories. The extremes were what appealed to me. I wouldn't want to live in them but they are fun to write about.

    Poor Steven,what a mess he is in!!

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    1. Hi, Julie, you did a beautiful job in your Polar stories. Someday we'll have to travel to Alaska together on a book tour. Fund Me that. LOL

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  7. That is quite the temp difference. Finally a normal named one too haha

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  8. Quite a difference in temperatures in the seasons, one extreme to another. Great excerpt.

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    1. The tension mounts! I think I'll admire Fairbanks from afar and skip those extreme temps.

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  9. Ooo--nice turn of events here! And 50 below? Yikes. The worst we've had here in Rochester, NY is wind chills of 20 below.

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    1. Twenty below, is way too cold too! Hi, Tamara!

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  10. Ooo--nice turn of events here! And 50 below? Yikes. The worst we've had here in Rochester, NY is wind chills of 20 below.

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  11. Thank you for the info I didn't know how Fairbanks got its name :)

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    1. Hi, Zeljka, I'm working hard to catch up today. Wonder if I'll accomplish it. LOL

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  12. Yikes! 90 to -50?! That's quite a range. Hopefully it's a very gradual warm up/cool down! :) Still... talk about extremes. Cool story excerpt, Yolanda. :)

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    1. Thanks, Colin, cool in the summer and cold in the winter. LOL It took me a year to acclimate. 90 degrees felt very cool!

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  13. Fairbanks looks very pretty although, like the other commenters I'm a little taken aback by how wide the temperature range is. Loved the excerpt.

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    1. Thanks, Kalpanaa. appreciate the visit!

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  14. I loved Alaska, so beautiful! Great excerpt!

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  15. I remember Fairbanks in the summer. Your picture makes me shiver. Nothing like a few degrees below zero to make a Californian shake in her boots. Great excerpt today, and thanks for telling us how this town got its name.

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    1. Hi, Lee, it's be a hard adjustment for someone used to warmth, but it can be done! :)

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  16. Great tension in this excerpt, Yolanda. I'm glad we only have median temps in the southern part of British Columbia. Some of these remote places and perhaps Anchorage have horrific murders - does it have to do with the cold?

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    1. They call it cabin fever, some folks go a bit crazy! Cooped up with almost 24 hours of darkness, and yes, it does send folks over the edge!

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  17. I would really like to visit Alaska. Or at least do a cruise there. Don't think it will ever happen now, getting a tad elderly for it. Don't bother with the draw for me, I already have your books.

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    1. Hi, Jo! Those cruises are luxurious, and for a woman who goes bowling regularly, I think you could do it. I'm thrilled to know you have my books! :)

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  18. That is a really broad range of temperatures, I did not know it could get that warm in Fairbanks. Another interesting excerpt :)

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  19. Hey, I know this place...
    I read about Fairbanks in Polar Night by Julie Flanders!

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    1. Julie, did a wonderful job describing Fairbanks! Polar Night rocked!

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  20. When I visited Alaska, I took the train from Anchorage to Denali and back. I wish I had gone to Fairbanks on one end of the train ride. Only 3 more days till I start your book (on a plane) but your teasers are making me want to start sooner.

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    1. Anchorage to Denali is very scenic. I do hope you find them fun!

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  21. Cold as 50 below. Wow, that's freeze a nutsack right off, I'd think.

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    1. It sure would, Ivy. LOL and piss as it streams!

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  22. Great excerpt, Yolanda! I'm so lucky to have found your blog. I love mysteries too:)
    Sudha from
    Everyday Muse

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    1. Thank you, sudhanair! I'll be over to visit you too!

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