Friday, April 22, 2016

S - SLEEPING LADY

S IS FOR SLEEPING LADY


Sleeping Lady Mountain or Mt. Susitna is one of my favorite views from Anchorage. I think I've talked about the mountain in each of my novels.

The Legend says: Mt. Susitna acquired the name ‘Sleeping Lady’, because its shape resembled a maiden at rest. Legend said the young woman came from a tribe of giants that occupied the land in a bygone age, and, when warring factions required her groom to negotiate a peace settlement, she lay down to sleep, and awaited his return. He died in the war, and no one wanted to awaken her to give her the news.



Photo Copyright
Murder & Obsession

Excerpt:


Captain Reed drummed his fingers on the top of his thigh. Forty-five years old, with salt and pepper hair, Bill Reed was the youngest officer to hold the position of Captain in Anchorage. An ulcer, testament to his dedication, had flared due to this mess with his top investigator. His phone, on speaker, sounded the ring of a placed call. He waited for someone to answer. 
Through the window to his left, Sleeping Lady Mountain’s new covering of snow reflected the purple hue of the sky. Captain Reed repeated in his head the childhood rhyme about a red sky at night. He wondered if a purple sky meant this living nightmare would get worse. He couldn’t believe Steven Quaid, an officer he’d chosen as his replacement, had run from authorities instead of facing the music. He considered Quaid a friend, but his position would not allow anything but professionalism and a hands-off attitude.




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Remember every comment during the A to Z will be an entry to win a 
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(signed if I can send by mail)



And a very special shout out to Chrys Fey
on the release of her first novel.


DIGITAL LINKS:


ALSO AVAILABLE IN PRINT!

Congratulations, Chrys!


47 comments:

  1. What a fascinating mountain - Sleeping Lady Mountain is exactly what it looks like. Another wonderful extract.

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    1. Thanks Kalpanaa, I loved this mountain, could look at it for hours, of course when the northern lights danced overhead, it's amazing!

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  2. I love legends like this - and the name 'Sleeping Lady' is splendid.

    Susan A Eames from
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

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    1. Hi Susan, thanks. I loved your post about sharks. Amazing!

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  3. I love legends like this - and the name 'Sleeping Lady' is splendid.

    Susan A Eames from
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

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  4. I remember the song Red Skies at Night by the Fixx. Good think I like the song because now it's stuck in my head.

    I’m exploring different types of dreams and their meanings.
    S is for Sleep Paralysis
    Stephen Tremp’s Breakthrough Blogs

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    1. LOL, sorry about that, I'm glad you like the song too! Hi, Stephen!

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  5. That's a stunning view of the mountain. I like how you work it into your books.

    Cheers - Ellen | http://thecynicalsailor.blogspot.com/2016/04/s-is-for-sailrite-nancy-drew.html

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    1. Hi, Ellen, loved your post today! Thanks for stopping by!

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  6. I can see the outline of the lady.

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  7. That is such a sad story - so she slumbers on, unaware that her groom is gone.
    Sophie
    Sophie's Thoughts & Fumbles | Wittegen Press | FB3X

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  8. Yes, I can see the sleeping maiden. What a tragic story.

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    Replies
    1. Hi, Jo, it is, but the mountain is beautiful!

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  9. I love mountains. My parents live in the mountains of NC and I love visiting.

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    1. I'm with you, love the mountains! Hi, Tamara!

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  10. That is quite the legend, can sure work itself into many a narrative

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  11. I've always loved fables and the outlandish explanation for certain land areas developed. Like the Great Lakes for example, being created by Paul Bunyan.

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    1. Yes, I remember that fable too! Hi, Jeffrey!

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  12. How interesting. There's a Sleeping Lady on Mt. Tamalpais, too. She resembles the one you include in your books.

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    1. Interesting, there are more than one! Hi, Lee!

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  13. I love the myths of the north. Have a terrific weekend! :)

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  14. Mount Timpanogos near my home in Utah is called the sleeping woman for similar reasons. There are all sorts of native legends and stories as to who she was and why she sleeps.

    https://ryanscarty.wordpress.com/

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    Replies
    1. And yet a third, how curious. Love it! Hi, Ryan, thanks for stopping by!

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  15. I really appreciate the insight you're giving to this book because I knew nothing about Alaska outside of it being the 49th State admitted to the United States. This is helping me get into book one which I have now started reading. I am in Chapter one.

    Visiting from the A to Z Blog Challenge.

    Shalom,
    Patricia @ EverythingMustChange

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    Replies
    1. Hi, Pat, I'm thrilled to learn that, and doubly thrilled to be giving folks some useful trivia or background on Alaska!

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  16. Late today with the reading :) Loved getting to know the sleeping lady better. I have a thing for mountains.

    Congrats to Chrys and all the best for her new release.

    Nilanjana.
    Madly-in-Verse

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    1. Hi, Nila, I'm late too. TG it's the weekend. Have a great one!

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  17. Such a sad story for a beautiful mountain.

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  18. Such a sad story for a beautiful mountain.

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  19. What a bittersweet legend about Sleeping Lady - and such a lovely photo showing her. Oh dear, purple skies and ulcers don't exactly bode well for serenity do they?

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  20. An interesting legend. A little sad, though.

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  21. "He died in the war, and no one wanted to awaken her to give her the news."

    So sad :-(

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  22. I love the visual and the story behind The Sleeping Lady. Really captivating.
    Writer In Transit

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  23. I really love the setting of your book, the way you explain about the geography and local lore. :)

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  24. I like the legend of the sleeping lady...

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  25. That's an interesting legend What does a purple sky signify, I wonder...

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