Wednesday, February 4, 2015

IWSG - NON-ENDINGS

INSECURE WRITER'S SUPPORT GROUP


Thanks goes to these awesome co-hosts for their hard works and great comments: 

Gwen Gardner,
Dolorah, 
Sarah Foster, 
and M. Pax!


I read a book last night. Took me four hours and when I finished I was pissed. It ended in a cliffhanger. There was a beginning, middle, but no end! Why? It's a trilogy, but that doesn't give the author the right not to tell a full story, or does it?


I've read too many of these recently, decent books, but I resented the ending or lack of one. I can't write a review with such a bad taste in my mouth. Is this a new trend? Did I miss something along the way, because I was taught that a book, a story no matter the length, should have a beginning, middle, and an ending? Most flash fiction challenges expect the basics. Sorry, a little off script, but this really does rile me!


Anyway, that's not really an insecurity, more of a pet peeve, but as far as insecurities go – this month I have them all! Waiting on word from the publisher, the editor, and beta readers is enough to drive a person to drink! Okay, now I feel better – not really, but it sounds good! Right?


What do you think about not telling a full story in a book of over 350 pages, is it fair to the readers? Is it the new way of doing things? How do you deal with the waiting once you let your baby, I mean book go, and no, drinking is not an option?!

FYI



Hey authors! Want some extra exposure for your books? Got a book trailer sitting around and collecting dust? Why not join the Book Trailer Love Fest Contest?

All you have to do is sign up, share, participate, and vote! The success of this is dependent upon you, so the more you share, the more exposure, the more votes, the higher your chance of winning the contest! Sharing is a requirement, so please keep that in mind before signing up. 

What do you win? 

You mean besides putting that book trailer to work and getting you exposure? You’ll receive a banner/badge, digital certificate, and bragging rights!

This is a fun, nifty little contest I’m putting on to help authors show off their book trailers! Join me for the week of Valentine’s Day for exuberant book trailer love! Oh! And don’t forget to sign up too! Bloggers are welcome!

Signup form:  CLICK HERE!



Blog:



For more information, please contact Samantha LaFantasie at sslafantasie@gmail.com with Book Trailer Love Fest in the subject. 


Subscribe to DEFENDING THE PEN by Email

55 comments:

  1. Sorry it left a bad taste in your mouth.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Ivy,

      It's why I wrote the blog. I just had to let go of it - bad taste, now gone!

      Delete
  2. I agree, all stories should have a beginning, middle and end. Otherwise it feels unfinished; I hate finishing a book but feeling like I haven't actually finished it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Laura,

      Me too, when you invest your time and money into something - you need that satisfaction!

      Delete
  3. I'm actually reading a book called "Beginnings, Middles & Ends" by Nancy Kress. She points out the same thing you do....books need an ending!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi randi!

      Oh good, at least that is the rule, hope more writers follow it!

      Delete
  4. Thanks for the tip on the book trailer contest.
    I think a book should definitely have an ending. It needs to wrap up the conflict.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Alex,

      Sounds like a good idea doesn't it. Book trailers are good, but only if someone sees them. :)

      Delete
  5. I get the desire to end on a cliffhanger just so the reader will read the next book, but it can definitely be frustrating if a book doesn't have an ending at all. It should at least wrap up most of the conflict, and then maybe leave one tiny little thing open that will keep the reader's attention.

    February IWSG Co-host

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Sarah,

      I ended each of my books as a stand alone. Maybe too many cliffhangers and intrigue inside to end it that way. But a teaser about book two is a good idea.

      Delete
  6. I hope you hear back from everyone soon with all good news! I know how hard it is to wait. And I also agree with the frustration of no ending.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Julie,

      Good news would be great - any news would be a relief right now. Just some word - all I hear is the silence! You know with all those doubts that whisper - it wasn't good enough, try again, or start over! LOL

      Delete
  7. Oh yeah, should definitely have an ending, a cliffhanger like a tv show or something is dumb. Things should wrap up but leave some open questions to the overall arc, mythology, etc

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Patt!

      I don't understand why a publisher would even allow it?

      Delete
  8. All stories should have an ending, but a small cliffhanger to get readers to want to read the next book is always good.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Chrys,

      I agree completely! Leaving readers unsatisfied is a crime! :)

      Delete
  9. I write series, but I always make each book a complete story. I don't mind cliffhangers, but only if the main story of the book is wrapped up so it feels like an ending, not like it's been cut off mid-scene!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Emma,

      Perfect, I agree. Do not cut me off because I won't be buying the next one!

      Delete
  10. Mother Dragon hates, and I mean HATES, those type of stories without a clear ending. She gets all outraged about that and feels she has just wasted the time invested in such stories. Don't know if it is a trend but shouldn't be.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Al,

      I agree, hate is a good word for that. I hope she lets the author know!
      Feel better soon!

      Delete
  11. I don't write completely clear endings, but I think I always provide enough of a resolution to satisfy readers. A trilogy surely only works when each book has its own story as well as the overriding arc. You can't just take a novel and slice it into 3 parts!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey AnnaLisa,

      Endings are a lot different today, and that's fine, the more unique the better, but no ending should be outlawed! And that's exactly what she did - the end doesn't happen until book 3, but I won't be spending my money!

      Delete
  12. I share your pet peeve. A story should have an end! It's OK to leave a few threads dangling if there is a sequel (or2), but there should be a wrap-up of the story.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Exactly, Kathy!

      It's not fair to the readers, those folks who spend the money!

      Delete
  13. Hi Yolanda! I like an ending to a novel, even if the ending is not a happy one. I also love great plot twists where the ending is something I didn't see coming.

    As for reading four straight hours to finish a book? I let my To Do List get too long, I think. I need to remedy that so I can catch up with the stacks of books around my house and the huge selection I have on my Kindle.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Patricia:

      I don't care what the ending is - just as long as there is one! At least for that book - the story arc for the trilogy can go on, but an ending for the book would be nice.

      I would rather read for 4 hours, although, I can't claim they are straight, than watch TV for that long. And gosh, sometimes I just have to step away from that to do list and disappear!

      Delete
  14. I hope that wasn't me! In my defense, my books that are sort of "non-ended" say right on it that it was originally published serially (12 episodes) but the version now available is as a trilogy because it would be 1200 pages, otherwise... But I get just as made if it isn't clear. I read a Dean Koontz recently I gave 2 stars for exactly that. I was pissed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Heavens no, this is a novel, not a serial. Everyone knows going in with your book and others like them what they're reading. By the way, great job!
      I found out after I read this book that the 'end' happens in book 3. That isn't right. The true workings of a trilogy I understand - I wrote one, but each book has to be a stand alone. A beginning, middle and end, a different mystery or plot for each book - just with the same characters!

      Delete
  15. The first book of my trilogy ended in a cliff hanger and people were really upset. So I added the first few chapters of the second book to close out the first one. Problem solved.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Stephen:

      Sounds like a solid plan! Cliff hangers are good for chapters and for setting up the next novel, but each book should tell it's own complete story.

      Delete
  16. The way I was told was each book should stand alone. We have no control over what seqence the trilogies, so I would think the rule makes sense. No cliffhangers at the end of a full novel unless you plan to make the sequel part of the first novel eventually. Even still, bad taste.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Exactly, stand alone, tell a full story - leave the reader satisfied!

      Delete
  17. I also think each book should stand alone. Each one needs an ending to the story. If it is a series, it can have an over-arcing story, but the story for that book needs to have an ending.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Totally agree Christine! You write them like no other!

      Delete
  18. I soooo HATE this trend of leaving books in cliffhangers! It's a vile marketing technique supposed to create interest in the sequel. All it does is anger me these days. Just because it worked for Harry Potter doesn't mean everyone should go on and do it. It's just lazy.

    Can you tell how much I despise the tactic?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Georgina,

      It seems to rile a lot of people! So good to see you again!

      Delete
  19. This is true of movies too and it's irritating. The best thing is to have a self-contained story that wraps up at the end and have another storyline that continues. That way the audience feels some closure. It works though since I'd watch the movie or read the book.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Maurice!

      Getting to be more so, some folks resent the happy ending so much, they do almost anything not to have an ending! Some get carried away!

      Delete
  20. Cliffhangers are so frustrating. I want a complete story, not just part of it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Diane,

      The time spent is so wasted!

      Delete
  21. I hear you, Yolanda! I think non endings are a cheap shot with the aim to get you to rush out and buy the next book, but it really has the opposite effect. Didn't those authors ever read the advice--don't p*i*s off your readers!

    Let's talk again soon!

    Denise :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Denise!

      I do owe you an email! And nope I don't think they're listening - this person was supposed to be a bestseller and had over 450 reviews on her book, which I should have read more closely. Should have read the one star reviews instead of the five star reviews, and then I wouldn't have wasted my time!

      Delete
  22. The trilogies and series seem to be the way things are going in books and movies. I guess keeping a franchise going has the potential of generating more money. I do think each part should stand alone however. It's only fair.

    Arlee Bird
    A to Z Challenge Co-host
    Tossing It Out

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Several years ago, seems the publishing world wanted trilogies. When I was first approached regarding my first book, the question was an automatic, can you write a trilogy. I said of course, even though I hadn't thought of it until that moment. Therefore a trilogy came into being, but still each book is stand alone, a separate plot, mystery, etc, but the same characters moving on in their lives. I think it was the publishers more than the writers pushing it. But that's just my take, now it's gotten out of hand with unfinished books!

      Delete
  23. Nope, every book needs to have a stand alone plot Something to resolve that moves the overall series plot forward.

    toasting you with a glass of Moscoto :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Donna,

      So good to hear from you, I've been thinking of you - really need to send an email - I've been bad about that lately! Take care! Thanks for the toast, all I have is Mango flavored water! Cheers!

      Delete
  24. I don't like clif hangers or serial story telling. If I grab a book inadvertly that is one I tell you, I don't bother looking at that author's work no matter how good the writing or story premise is. I'd rather wait until the whole story is done and then read it. I'm not buying it in bits and pieces. Trilogies are just a series involving 3 books. Each part carries one aspect of the story and can has a complete arc of beginning, middle, end. Granted the first book sets the overall plot and solutions goal and it also sets reasons to read the next book in the series but each story is a step in solving the problem--whatever it is.

    I hate ambiguous endings too.

    I hear you on being pissed off and not wanting to write the review. I think I've done one review involving a cliff hanger. I was pretty clear that I thought that the ending was a disservice to the reader even though the story was good.

    Sia McKye Over Coffee

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think lots of folks feel the same way, I've even had folks tell me they won't read my trilogy until all three books are done - surprising. Even telling them they're stand alone won't change their minds.
      So no more trilogies!

      Delete
  25. I totally agree with you about cliff-hangers. And the degree of my annoyance with a book like that is directly proportional to its length. Nothing like reading 400+ pages of intricate story, and then have it leave everything hanging, purely as a means to coerce readers into buying the next book. More and more writers are writing series, especially trilogies, (the "in thing", I suppose) but after investing my time and money into reading a book, I expect an ending, dammit!!!

    No, I have no opinion on this matter at all...

    I hope you hear from your publisher, editor and beta readers soon. (I haven't read the book yet, but my money's on it being as terrific as your others.)

    Happy weekend!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Susan:

      Thanks for the confidence! And I'm finding so many folks agree with us about the need for an ending, but it makes me wonder, why aren't the writers listening?
      Loved your post today! Happy weekend to you too!

      Delete
  26. Cliffhangers are a part of the marketing so they are here to stay. Personally, I've noticed that they are very effective in getting people engaged on a conversation about a story. The more people are engaged, the more the pot kind of boils while the writer works on the next draft of their book. Thus it all feeds into the hype of the next pending release. Let us not forget, Yolanda, that writing is a "for-profit" business.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Michael,

      Apparently so! But there are some who are more successful than others! This book did not entice me to buy the next two, it only pissed me off! LOL

      Delete
  27. Hi Yolanda! I am with you-I want all three. It is an insult otherwise-just my opinion. I would feel cheated, as you did~ Sad, I certainly don't want this to be a new wave-

    It is nice to visit you and thank you for dropping by :D

    ReplyDelete
  28. I'm with you... when you had the bad taste... I get it that authors want to bring the reader back for book 2, but if the writing is strong enough, they will... out of natural curiosity alone.

    I'd love to write a trilogy (who wouldn't) but could never think of leaving the reader stranded :)

    ReplyDelete
  29. I would totally burn the book!! hahaha... that sucks!

    ReplyDelete

Would love to hear from you, say hello and leave your blog address - I'll visit, but please take with you my undying gratitude that you stopped by for a read. Be well, be happy, and may your blog surfing bring you joy!